Erotica Readers & Writers Association Blog

Saturday, May 23, 2015

Does a Print Option Lend Credence?

by Lucy Felthouse

A while back, I posed the question on my Facebook page about whether, if I put one of my self-published titles into print via Createspace, people would want to buy it. I got various responses, most of which were favourable, so I did indeed go through the process of putting the title into print on demand.

But a comment one person made really made me think. I can't remember the exact wording they used, but it was something along the lines of, if an eBook is also available in print, it makes it appear more professional, less like a self-published title. Even if it is self-published. Apparently, it just gives the impression of more professionalism, probably something to do with that if the author has gone to the trouble of putting the book into paperback format, that they'll also have gone to the trouble of getting the book properly edited, formatted, etc. I can understand the thinking - we all know how many crappy quality books are out there, and not just self-published ones, either. We have to battle against opinions that eBooks are somehow inferior to print books, and also, that indie published stuff hasn't been professionally produced. It's infuriating, but there it is. All we can do is hope our books get into people's hands, and that those people will then leave positive reviews on Amazon. Or even negative ones, if they didn't like the story - you can win 'em all, after all - but at least if they make no comment on terrible formatting, spelling, grammar and so on, then at least other readers can rest assured that the book's been done right.

But simply selling a book in both eBook and print format - does that give it extra credence? Make you more confident you're buying a quality product? There's no right or wrong answer here, guys, I really want to know what you think. As I said, the original commenter really gave me pause for thought, as it wasn't something I'd considered before, so your opinion would be much appreciated. And please, share the post and encourage your friends to weigh in, too. It's a very interesting topic, so the more opinions, the better.

Happy Reading!
Lucy x

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Author Bio:


Lucy Felthouse is a very busy woman! She writes erotica and erotic romance in a variety of subgenres and pairings, and has over 100 publications to her name, with many more in the pipeline. These include several editions of Best Bondage Erotica, Best Women's Erotica 2013 and Best Erotic Romance 2014. Another string to her bow is editing, and she has edited and co-edited a number of anthologies, and also edits for a small publishing house. She owns Erotica For All, is book editor for Cliterati, and is one eighth of The Brit Babes. Find out more at http://www.lucyfelthouse.co.uk. Join her on Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe to her newsletter at: http://eepurl.com/gMQb9

2 comments:

  1. I wish someone had commented on this. Personally, I don't feel that way, but then I'm an author, not a reader.

    I do know that the epidemic of poor editing appears to be spreading. I'm currently reading a technical book for a journal review. This book is by a respected publisher. It's hard cover, and probably costs about $150. Yet it's full of typos and editing blunders!

    If I had bought it, I'd want my money back.

    Sadly, the ease of publishing seems to have made people think they can relax their standards about the earlier stages in the process.

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    1. That's terrible! I'd be so embarrassed if something of mine was out there and was full of errors. Yes, the occasional ones slip through... not that that's okay, but we're only human. Missing the occasional error is different to not bothering to edit/proofread in the first place.

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